Skin issues in babies

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While the world swears by the smoothness of a baby’s skin, every mother, at some point of time is bound to be flummoxed by the sudden appearance of rashes or eruptions on her baby’s face or body. While most of these are completely harmless and disappear as mysteriously as they appear, others may need your doctor’s attention. Although it is not advisable to try and diagnose or treat any skin problem at home, it helps to have a fair idea of what is bothering your child, so that you may take the initial steps to address the skin health issue. Read on to gain an idea of what may be ailing your child, and how to go about addressing it.

1-300x181 Skin issues in babies

  • Nappy rash: If your baby is crying without any obvious reason, it may be time to check her nappy. A red rash on the baby’s genitalia, bottom, or thighs is called nappy rash. Severe nappy rash can even extend to the baby’s back or tummy. Caused by wearing a wet or soiled diaper for a long time, nappy rash can be treated by several over-the-counter creams. Do give the baby’s skin time to dry before you put the next diaper on after removing a soiled one. Consult a doctor of the rash appears repetitively, as it can cause yeast or bacterial infections too!
  • Yellow skin: If your baby’s skin and the whites of her eyes have a yellow tint, this could be a symptom of jaundice. While almost 60% of all babies have yellowish skin, it is a temporary skin condition which subsides on its own, or with mild treatment. It is recommended that the baby is exposed to mild sunlight every day to address the issue. However, if the yellow tint does not subside, it is important to consult a paediatrician.
  • Cradle Cap: Thick scales or flakes on the baby’s scalp which resemble dandruff are termed cradle-cap. This common condition is not a sign of inadequate hygiene, but a result of overproduction of skin oil in the oil glands of the hair follicles. This condition may be aggravated by a yeast infection. Shampooing frequently and lightly massaging the baby’s scalp is one way to start treatment for oily skin on the scalp. If it is aggravated, you may consult your paediatrician who will prescribe a skin care cream.

While these are the most common skin disorders that a newborn faces, this list is by no means exhaustive. As you little peanut grows and ventures out into the playground or to school, she may pick up other ailments such as the hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), chicken pox, measles and ringworm among many others. Do look out for any rashes or eruptions as your bathe your baby. These are the earliest indication of any illness, and adequate care of skin can help you address the issue early.

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